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Blue Rising
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Questions

Postby Blue Rising » Wed Jun 22, 2016 4:33 pm

Lord help me, I still have questions once in a while. I haven't wanted to ask any in quite some time. Gets me into trouble. Oh well. I needed a place to ask. Not a person. But a place. So here it is.

Anybody know why Innana descended into the underworld? I can't find it to read, can't tap into the space, and can't grasp it otherwise apparently.
Do not fashion me a maiden who needs saving from the dragons. I am the Dragon. And I will eat you whole.

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Christine
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Re: Questions

Postby Christine » Wed Jun 22, 2016 4:58 pm

What a good question, and as with all good questions the answer comes from within. So here is my answer IMHO, Innana (Persephone) are archetypical beings, who made the descent to the underworld for there lies the passage out of this simulation. In almost all myth (our true story, not the fabricated one we reside in) tells of the journey through hell. There are other reasons and for me it has to do with rescuing parts of ourselves that have been severed and traumatized.

I'm in a bit of a rush today but will delve deeper as I can.

Blue Rising wrote:Lord help me, I still have questions once in a while. I haven't wanted to ask any in quite some time. Gets me into trouble. Oh well. I needed a place to ask. Not a person. But a place. So here it is.

Anybody know why Innana descended into the underworld? I can't find it to read, can't tap into the space, and can't grasp it otherwise apparently.
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Naga_Fireball
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Re: Questions

Postby Naga_Fireball » Wed Jun 22, 2016 5:21 pm

If Hades represents night & death ie darkness itself, then perhaps Persephone Innana is representative of the New Moon (darkmoon).

She becomes a symbol of fecundity that survives death, much like the pomegranate seed .

In fact pomegranates are present on the High Priestess tarot card in some of the older decks. It is no accident that the moon goddess governs many matters of life & death, and even rules on subtleties of the Law!

Didn't ancient hebrew women especially celebrate the new moon to bring sacrifice and worship the feminine aspect of God?
Brotherhood falls asunder at the touch of fire!
He finds his fellow guilty of a skin
Not coloured like his own, and having power
To enforce the wrong, for such a worthy cause
Dooms and devotes him as his lawful prey.
~William Cowper

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Naga_Fireball
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Re: Questions

Postby Naga_Fireball » Wed Jun 22, 2016 5:24 pm

P.s. pomegranates look a lot like ovaries and ancient people were probably amazed that an egg finds its way thru the darkness between ovary and fallopian tube, Lol

Like the moon on a dark night, magical and secret.


From wiki:



Ancient Egypt

Ancient Egyptians regarded the pomegranate as a symbol of prosperity and ambition. According to the Ebers Papyrus, one of the oldest medical writings from around 1500 BC, Egyptians used the pomegranate for treatment of tapeworm and other infections. [47]

Ancient Greece

The Greeks were familiar with the fruit far before it was introduced to Rome via Carthage. [48] In Ancient Greek mythology, the pomegranate was known as the "fruit of the dead", and believed to have sprung from the blood of Adonis. [47][49]

The myth of Persephone, the goddess of the underworld, prominently features the pomegranate. In one version of Greek mythology, Persephone was kidnapped by Hades and taken off to live in the underworld as his wife. Her mother, Demeter (goddess of the Harvest), went into mourning for her lost daughter, thus all green things ceased to grow. Zeus, the highest-ranking of the Greek gods, could not allow the Earth to die, so he commanded Hades to return Persephone. It was the rule of the Fates that anyone who consumed food or drink in the underworld was doomed to spend eternity there. Persephone had no food, but Hades tricked her into eating six pomegranate seeds while she was still his prisoner, so she was condemned to spend six months in the underworld every year. During these six months, while Persephone sits on the throne of the underworld beside her husband Hades, her mother Demeter mourns and no longer gives fertility to the earth. This was an ancient Greek explanation for the seasons. [50] Dante Gabriel Rossetti's painting Persephona depicts Persephone holding the fatal fruit. The number of seeds Persephone ate varies, depending on which version of the story is told. The number ranges from three to seven, which accounts for just one barren season if it is just three or four seeds, or two barren seasons (half the year) if she ate six or seven seeds. [citation needed]

The pomegranate also evoked the presence of the Aegean Triple Goddess who evolved into the Olympian Hera, who is sometimes represented offering the pomegranate, as in the Polykleitos' cult image of the Argive Heraion (see below). [citation needed] According to Carl A. P. Ruck and Danny Staples, the chambered pomegranate is also a surrogate for the poppy's narcotic capsule, with its comparable shape and chambered interior. [51] On a Mycenaean seal illustrated in Joseph Campbell's Occidental Mythology 1964, figure 19, the seated Goddess of the double-headed axe (the labrys) offers three poppy pods in her right hand and supports her breast with her left. She embodies both aspects of the dual goddess, life-giving and death-dealing at once. The Titan Orion was represented as "marrying" Side, a name that in Boeotia means "pomegranate", thus consecrating the primal hunter to the Goddess. Other Greek dialects call the pomegranate rhoa; its possible connection with the name of the earth goddess Rhea, inexplicable in Greek, proved suggestive for the mythographer Karl Kerenyi, who suggested the consonance might ultimately derive from a deeper, pre-Indo-European language layer. [citation needed]

In the 5th century BC, Polycleitus took ivory and gold to sculpt the seated Argive Hera in her temple. She held a scepter in one hand and offered a pomegranate, like a 'royal orb', in the other. [52] "About the pomegranate I must say nothing," whispered the traveller Pausanias in the 2nd century, "for its story is somewhat of a holy mystery." [52] In the Orion story, Hera cast pomegranate-Side (an ancient city in Antalya) into dim Erebus — "for daring to rival Hera's beauty", which forms the probable point of connection with the older Osiris/Isis story. [citation needed] Since the ancient Egyptians identified the Orion constellation in the sky as Sah the "soul of Osiris", the identification of this section of the myth seems relatively complete. [original research?] Hera wears, not a wreath nor a tiara nor a diadem, but clearly the calyx of the pomegranate that has become her serrated crown. [citation needed] The pomegranate has a calyx shaped like a crown. In Jewish tradition, it has been seen as the original "design" for the proper crown. [53] In some artistic depictions, the pomegranate is found in the hand of Mary, mother of Jesus. [citation needed]

Brotherhood falls asunder at the touch of fire!
He finds his fellow guilty of a skin
Not coloured like his own, and having power
To enforce the wrong, for such a worthy cause
Dooms and devotes him as his lawful prey.
~William Cowper


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