Gut Health 101: What is the Microbiome?

"Silence is golden when you can't think of a good answer."
-Muhammad Ali
Post Reply
User avatar
Spiritwind
Posts: 1281
Joined: Fri Feb 20, 2015 4:24 pm
Location: Inland NW, U.S.
Has thanked: 2294 times
Been thanked: 2657 times

Gut Health 101: What is the Microbiome?

Post by Spiritwind »

I have recently been inspired to look more into the importance of the microbiome, as I was reflecting on the many ways we have been comprised.


Published Dec 22, 2016 - by Dr. Edward Group
Gut Health 101: What Is the Microbiome?

https://www.globalhealingcenter.com/nat ... icrobiome/" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

The human body is a complex, interconnected ecosystem and the gut is where your body interacts the most with the outside world. Your gut acts as the frontline of your immune system, as it is constantly exposed to new microbes and molecules that come from the things you eat and drink. The processes that take place in the gut are involved in the central nervous system, brain, and even influence your mood. But you can’t begin a discussion about the gut’s importance without discussing the organisms that live there.

So, What Is the Microbiome?
The collection of microbes that live in and on the human body is known as the microbiota.[1] The microbiome refers to the complete set of genes within these microbes. Microbial genes significantly influence how the body operates and even outnumber human genes by a ratio of 100:1.[2] Each of us has a unique microbiota and a unique microbiome. The microbes that live in your body are determined by what you're exposed to and these colonies are constantly in flux. Geography, health status, stress, diet, age, gender, and everything you touch all affect the composition of your microbiota.[3]

Public Health, Germ Theory, & the Microbiome
Scientists have known about microorganisms for hundreds of years. In 1673, Antony van Leeuwenhoek wrote to the Royal Society of London about his discovery of tiny “animalcules” with the use of his “microscopes.” Leeuwenhoek found microbes almost everywhere he looked,[4] but the discovery was largely ignored until the 1870s when their role in the cause and spread of disease was observed. Previously, doctors believed that bad air caused disease. Robert Koch proved that tiny microorganisms were responsible. His discovery solidified the validity of germ theory — the idea that certain microbes cause specific diseases.[5]

Germ theory created a scientific rationale for cleanliness that became the precursor to it becoming a moral and social imperative. People began bathing daily. Soap, once considered a luxury, became a basic household necessity. Doctors and surgeons started washing their hands and sanitizing their instruments.[6] New laws led to public health initiatives that limited the spread of disease and saved lives.[6]

Until recently, scientists focused almost solely on how pathogenic microbes negatively affect humans. There has since been a realization that some microorganisms are actually beneficial to human health.[7] More attention is now given to the microbiome and its role in health and immunity.[8] Launched in 2008, The Human Microbiome Project (HMP) was created to better understand the relationship between health, disease, and the microbiome.[9]

The Makeup of the Microbiome
The microbiota is comprised of a dizzying number of microorganisms. Bacteria make up the bulk — about 30-50 trillion cells.[10] The human body itself contains about 37 trillion human cells.[11] It may be disconcerting to think of yourself as mostly microbial cells, but, by weight, you’re definitely mostly human as microbial cells are significantly smaller than human cells. Bacterial cells range from 0.2-10 microns (micrometers) across; human cells range from 10-100 microns.[12] For reference, the average dust mite, which is microscopic, is 200-300 microns wide.

If you’ve seen the oft-quoted 10:1 ratio (10 microbes to 1 human cell), you might be surprised to learn that it was actually just an estimate that circulated throughout academic and scientific resources as fact. It is now regarded as academic urban legend.[13]

It's believed that humans carry about three pounds of bacteria in their intestines.[14] Everyone's individual microbiome is as unique as their fingerprint and comprised of hundreds of different types of bacteria.[15] The specific number of bacteria cells varies throughout the day and is always turning over.[16]

Although bacteria account for most of the mass of the microbiota, viruses are actually the most abundant inhabitants.[8, 17] We tend to think of viruses as harmful, but that’s not always the case. The viruses found in the gut are primarily bacteriophages, meaning that they infect gut bacteria cells but they don't necessarily harm them. Rather, they have a symbiotic relationship. Viruses can quickly transfer genes — beneficial genes. So, if new bacteria are introduced to your gut, either through diet or probiotics, the viral cells can help the bacteria thrive by transferring the genetic code.[18]

The Role of the Human Microbiota
The role of the microbiome is so central to the body’s operations that it essentially acts as an organ.[18] The microbiome impacts aging, digestion, the immune system, mood, and cognitive function.

Some of the bacteria in the gut produce enzymes that support digestion, especially the digestion of polysaccharides — healthy and complex sugars found in plant foods.[19] These bacteria also provide B vitamins, vitamin K, and short chain fatty acids. The microbiota also influences metabolic rate.[20]

A strong microbiome is the foundation of your immune system. When you were born, your gut was a clean slate, ready to learn.[21] Exposure to microbes provides the education that trains the immune system how to respond to different organisms. In this way, the immune system mediates the relationship between the body and the microbes it hosts.[21] Harmful organisms are dealt with, helpful organisms exist in harmony and contribute to good health overall.[22]

Research has also revealed the important role the microbiome has on mental health. There is a complex relationship between the gut and brain, called the gut-brain axis (GBA). The microbiota interacts with the central nervous system to regulate brain chemistry and mediate stress response, anxiety, and memory.[23]

How Is the Human Microbiota Formed?
It's generally agreed that the human body is first exposed to microbes during birth.[18, 24]

The makeup of the mother's microbiota changes during pregnancy and is extremely influential.[25] Babies born vaginally are colonized primarily by the Lactobacillus genus of bacteria. Newborns delivered by Caesarean section are exposed to skin microbes such as Staphylococcus, Corynebacterium, and Propionibacterium.[26] Whether the baby was born at home or the hospital can also affect the composition of the baby's microbiota.[3]

As babies grow, their microbiome will change. In the first few months of life, the body is colonized by relatively few species of microbes — only about 100. By the age of three, a child's microbiota possesses closer to 1,000 species of microbes and begins to resemble the microbiota of an adult. Puberty and, much later, menopause are two other life events that can significantly change the composition of the microbiota.[3]

The Bacteria in Your Gut Microbiome
Microbiome composition may vary throughout the intestines; most are concentrated in the large intestine. The bacteria in the average adult gut include Bifidobacterium, Lactobacillus, Bacteroides, Clostridium, Escherichia, Streptococcus, and Ruminococcus. Not only will diet influence the microbial composition of the microbiota, the microbiota influences the nutritional value of food.[27] Though specific bacteria vary, they share many of the same genes.[28]

Humans do not have the ability to produce the enzymes required to break down complicated nutrients. However, gut bacteria do have that ability and it's absolutely essential for proper digestion. Bacteria enable us to eat a diverse diet and receive a broad range of micronutrients and phytonutrients.[29]

Supporting the Microbiome
Your microbiome is constantly changing.[1] You rely on your microbiome for many processes, including digestion and immune system function; the stronger it is, the better off you'll be. To positively shape your microbiome, eat a diverse diet rich in complex carbohydrates and fiber.[30] Probiotic supplements can also help strengthen the microbiota. Choosing the best probiotic supplement is a whole other subject but, bottom line, the best probiotic supplements contain an assortment of probiotic strains and prebiotics. Prebiotics are food that help probiotics flourish.

I personally recommend FloraTrex™. It contains 25 different probiotic strains that support digestive health, mood, and promote a balanced microbiota; it provides prebiotics, too.
I see your love shining out from my furry friends faces, when I look into their eyes. I see you in the flower’s smile, the rainbow, and the wind in the trees....

User avatar
Spiritwind
Posts: 1281
Joined: Fri Feb 20, 2015 4:24 pm
Location: Inland NW, U.S.
Has thanked: 2294 times
Been thanked: 2657 times

Re: Gut Health 101: What is the Microbiome?

Post by Spiritwind »

I went to hear a longer more in depth presentation by Nonia with Clearwater Cultures (http://www.clearwatercultures.com" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;) and now I am even more motivated to educate myself so I can incorporate this new understanding into my every day consciousness and thinking patterns. So I will most likely be adding to this thread as I go along. I learned a lot from her, more a different way of seeing than anything, but I liked it! I will write more as time permits. I’m always excited when I meet someone who is on fire for the simple reason of loving this earth, and wanting to help herself and her family heal in an increasingly toxic environment. They want us to be afraid, and feel helpless.

But the earth herself has the answers, if we can learn how to listen to her, and tune into her very real guidance. We, too, are her children, as long as we are in form, just like every other biological living thing here, and she can help restore us to a state of balance. This awareness has the potential to literally change the course we are on, if it were to come into a state of being common knowledge. But it flies in the face of what we have been taught to believe, and the “kill it or cut it out” mentality and attitude in so called modern medicine. Just remember, we humans have been on this planet for thousands of years before our current state of treating health issues came into common usage, and not many years at all since it became a “for profit” system. We are living proof that they were doing something right, or we would have died out and wouldn’t be here now.

Difference Between Microbiome and Microbiota

https://www.differencebetween.com/diffe ... icrobiota/" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

Key Difference – Microbiome vs Microbiota
 
Microorganisms are present everywhere. Their numbers are uncountable, and they live on and in animal bodies. It is estimated that around 100 trillion microbes are present in the human body. This number is ten times the number of human cells. Microbiota and microbiome are two terms used to describe these microorganisms. Microbiota refers to all types microorganisms present in a particular location. Human microbiota refers to the microorganisms present in and on the human body. The term microbiome is used to refer the entire genetic makeup of the microbiota. Human microbiome refers to the genetic composition of human microbiota. These two terms sometimes used interchangeably. However, it is important to recognize the difference between these two terms. The key difference between microbiome and microbiota is that microbiota includes the entire population of microorganisms that colonizes a particular location or organism while microbiome refers to the genetic makeup of the respective microbiota.

CONTENTS
1. Overview and Key Difference
2. What is Microbiota
3. What is Microbiome
4. Side by Side Comparison – Microbiome vs Microbiota in Tabular Form
5. Summary

What is Microbiota?
Microbiota refers to the entire population of microorganisms that colonize a particular location. All types of microorganisms including bacteria, viruses, fungi, archaea, and protozoans are addressed by the term microbiota. For example, human microbiota refers to the entire microbial population and viruses in and on the human body. Microbes are mainly present in human gastrointestinal tract and skin. The microbial population in the gastrointestinal tract of a human is known as gut microbiota. Gut microbiota is involved in human health and nutrition. Healthy gut microbiota is largely responsible for the overall health of the organism. Human gut microbiota is mainly composed of two major phyla named bacteriodetes and firmicutes. Earlier it was assumed that the gut microbiota contains 500-1000 species of microorganisms. However, recent studies have revealed that the collective human gut microbiota comprises of over 35000 bacterial species.

From a microbial and immunological perspective, microorganisms are considered as pathogens. Hence, host immune systems always tend to eliminate them from the body. However, the majority of the human gut microbiota contains nonpathogenic and cohabit microorganisms which are important in many ways to humans. The human gut commensal microbes support nutrient metabolism, drug metabolism, and intestinal barrier function, and prevent colonization of pathogenic microorganisms.

Human gut microbiota mainly comprises of anaerobic microorganisms. Hence, the analysis of gut microbiota was difficult. However, once the anaerobic culturing techniques were developed, it was identified that gut microbiota is dominated by Bacteroids, Clostridium, Bifidobacterium, etc.

There are several factors affecting the healthy gut microbiota. They are age of the human, diet, and antibiotics. Antibiotics are used to combat pathogenic microorganisms. However, due to their broad spectrum, antibiotics may also work against the normal microbiota in our gut.

What is Microbiome?
Microbiome refers to the genes or the genetic makeup of the microbiota. The collection of overall genes of the microbial community is considered under microbiome. Human microbiome refers to the complete genetic material of human microbiota. Compared to the human genome, human microbiome is considered as the second genome, and it contains 100 times genes than human genes.

Sometimes the word ‘microbiome’ is often used to refer the microbial population and the combined genetic material of the microorganisms in a particular environment.

The genes of microbiota interact with the human genome to function together, helping to improve human health and fight against diseases. These genes are involved in numerous beneficial functions such as supporting life such as digesting food, preventing disease-causing pathogens from invading the body, and synthesizing essential nutrients and vitamins.

Research carried out on microbiome have expressed that the human microbiome is a fundamental component of human physiology. Therefore, human microbiome is an important factor of human cellular activities. Changes in microbiome affect the normal function of the human body and disease development.
I see your love shining out from my furry friends faces, when I look into their eyes. I see you in the flower’s smile, the rainbow, and the wind in the trees....

User avatar
Spiritwind
Posts: 1281
Joined: Fri Feb 20, 2015 4:24 pm
Location: Inland NW, U.S.
Has thanked: 2294 times
Been thanked: 2657 times

Re: Gut Health 101: What is the Microbiome?

Post by Spiritwind »

Image


What is the difference between Microbiome and Microbiota?

Microbiome vs Microbiota
Microbiome is the entire collection of genetic material of microbiota in a particular location.
Microbiota is the entire microbial population in a particular location such as human body, animal body, etc.

Focus
Microbiome focuses on genes and genetic composition
Microbiota focuses on different types and species of microorganisms.

Importance of Human Microbiome and Microbiota
Microbiome is important to understand the collaborative function of microbiome with the human genome.
Microbiota is important in many aspects including nutrition, disease prevention, immune responses, etc

Summary – Microbiota vs Microbiome
The terms microbiota and microbiome are sometimes used interchangeably. However, there is a difference between microbiota and microbiome. Microbiota refers to the entire population of microorganisms colonized in a particular location. Microbiome refers to the genetic material of the microbiota of a particular location or the entire collection of genes of microbiota. This is the main difference between microbiome and microbiota.

References:
1. Jandhyala, Sai Manasa, Rupjyoti Talukdar, Chivkula Subramanyam, Harish Vuyyuru, Mitnala Sasikala, and D. Nageshwar Reddy. “Role of the normal gut microbiota.” World Journal of Gastroenterology : WJG. Baishideng Publishing Group Inc, 07 Aug. 2015. Web. Available here. 16 June 2017
2. Ursell, Luke K., Jessica L. Metcalf, Laura Wegener Parfrey, and Rob Knight. “Defining the Human Microbiome.” Nutrition reviews. U.S. National Library of Medicine, Aug. 2012. Web. Available here. 16 June 2017
3. MacGill, Markus. “What is the gut microbiota? What is the human microbiome?”Medical News Today. MediLexicon International, 24 Mar. 2016. Web. Available here. 17 June 2017.
I see your love shining out from my furry friends faces, when I look into their eyes. I see you in the flower’s smile, the rainbow, and the wind in the trees....

User avatar
Spiritwind
Posts: 1281
Joined: Fri Feb 20, 2015 4:24 pm
Location: Inland NW, U.S.
Has thanked: 2294 times
Been thanked: 2657 times

Re: Gut Health 101: What is the Microbiome?

Post by Spiritwind »

I still have a great deal of interest in this topic. I think it holds many answers going forward.

How do you cultivate a healthy plant microbiome?

https://phys.org/news/2019-12-cultivate ... biome.html" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

Scientists are homing in on what a healthy human microbiome looks like, mapping the normal bacteria that live in and on the healthy human body. But what about a healthy plant microbiome?

Is there even such a thing as a healthy plant microbiome in today's agricultural fields, with acres of identical plants assaulted by pesticides and herbicides and hyped up on fertilizer?

A new study by University of California, Berkeley, microbial ecologists used experimental evolution to help identify the core microbiome of commercial tomatoes. They selected for those microbial taxa that best survived on the plants and then showed that these "domesticated" microbial communities are able to effectively fend off random microbes that land on the plants. In other words, these selected communities look like a stable, healthy plant microbiome, akin to what a robust tomato plant might pass to its offspring.

The results are good news for growers who hope that manipulating the plant microbiome, perhaps with probiotics, will make for healthier fields that need less fertilizer and less or no pesticides to produce good yields.

"I see the implications of this work not just being about probiotics, but also about guiding agricultural practice," said study leader Britt Koskella, a UC Berkeley assistant professor of integrative biology. "When planting fields, we should be thinking about how what we do—whether it is age structuring of crops or monocropping versus crop rotations, what is in the soil or what is living nearby—can impact the acquisition and health of the plant microbiome. We should be manipulating the growing conditions in a way that microbial transmission is more akin to what would happen naturally."

Koskella, lead author Norma Morella, who is now a postdoctoral fellow at the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center in Seattle, and their colleagues reported their findings online this week in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS).

How do seedlings get microbiomes from their mothers?
Koskella studies the microbial ecology of plants and how it affects plant health, much like biologists study the human microbiome's role in health. Focusing on agricultural crops, she has some of the same concerns as biologists who worry about the transmission of a healthy human microbiome—skin, gut and more—from mother to baby.

When seedlings are first put into fields, for example, there are often no nearby adult plants from which they can acquire leaf and stem microbes. In the absence of maternal transmission, Koskella wondered, how do these plants acquire their microbiomes, and are these microbiomes ideal for the growing plants?

And, if the microbiomes are not well adapted—for example, not resistant to disease-carrying microbes—can they be improved?

These questions are becoming increasingly important as growers and industry alike try to improve crop yield and sustainability by surrounding seeds with desirable microbes, engineering soil microbial communities or spraying desired microbes on growing plants.

Increasing evidence also shows that microbiomes can affect yield, tolerance to drought and even the flowering time of plants. Can microbiomes be enhanced to achieve this, and will enhanced microbiomes survive long enough to help the plants?

The new study is encouraging.

"We already know that, in theory, you can select for microbes that perform particular functions: increased yield, drought tolerance or disease resistance, for example," Koskella said. "We are showing here that you can, in principle, create a microbial community that has the function you are interested in, but also is uninvadable, because it is really well-adapted to that plant."

Cultivating a core microbiome
The researchers' experiments, conducted in greenhouses on UC Berkeley's Oxford Tract, involved taking five types of tomatoes and spraying four successive generations of plants with the microbiomes of the previous generation. The first generation was sprayed with a broad mix of microbes found on a variety of tomatoes in an outdoor field at UC Davis.

Nurturing the microbial community of each type of tomato through successive generations allowed it to adapt to each strain, ideally weeding out the maladapted microbes and allowing the well-adapted ones to flourish.

By sequencing the 16S ribosomal subunits of the tomatoes' microbial communities after each generation—a technique that allows identification of different bacterial taxa—they were able to show that, by the fourth generation, only 25% of the original microbial taxa remained.

"So, 75 percent of the original bacteria that we spray on go virtually extinct during the experiment," Koskella said. "That is really interesting in itself, because it suggests that a lot of the microbes out there aren't well adapted, they are kind of there by chance. The wind blew them there, rain splashed them there, but they are not thriving, they are likely not adapted to that particular environment."

The remaining 25%, which were very similar across all independent selection lines and across the five tomato strains, looked very much like a "core" microbiome: the key microbes necessary for a healthy plant.

When Morella sprayed tomato plants with a microbial mixture—half from the partially adapted microbiome of the first generation, half from the more mature fourth generation microbiome—the fourth generation microbes took over, suggesting that they were much better adapted to the tomato.

"I think this work on the tomato supports the idea that leaf bacteria are probably very distinctive and have traits that are required for them to grow well on those plants, and that just the fact that you can find things there may mean that they are there only transiently and probably in the process of dying," said co-author Steven Lindow, a UC Berkeley professor of plant and microbial biology who has been investigating plant-pathogen interactions for nearly 50 years. "This is very consistent with what we had found before, that good plant colonists can grow on many plants and, in so doing, usurp the ability of anybody else to also grow there. The prophylactic effect is definitely very strong and real and very important in keeping other plant colonists away."

"What you want to ask, really, is, 'Who wins when you put them head to head? The selected microbiome or the unselected microbiome?'" Koskella said. "That, to me, is my favorite part of the whole experiment and was the 'aha! moment': Selection works, you really can select for a microbiome that it is well adapted and not invadable, at least under the conditions we used for selection."

Koskella's group is now running further experiments to determine whether the selected microbiome actually improves plant health, resilience and productivity, and whether probiotic microbes can be integrated successfully into the core microbiome for lasting crop benefits.
I see your love shining out from my furry friends faces, when I look into their eyes. I see you in the flower’s smile, the rainbow, and the wind in the trees....

User avatar
Spiritwind
Posts: 1281
Joined: Fri Feb 20, 2015 4:24 pm
Location: Inland NW, U.S.
Has thanked: 2294 times
Been thanked: 2657 times

Re: Gut Health 101: What is the Microbiome?

Post by Spiritwind »

I am going to post a few articles recently posted on Clearwater Cultures FB page, although they are probably also available on their website. Love their products and find value in what she has to say about the current pandemic sweeping across the planet. I truly figured this was another one of those boy who cried wolf scenarios, but apparently, it has morphed into a real happening this time. I have some of her healing cream and apply ample amounts to my face and hands, while thanking the beneficial microbes for their role in keeping me healthy, before I go out to the big city. I plan to just stay home after our necessary trips out the next couple days. It really IS getting kooky where we live, so I’m fairly certain it’s going to affect all our lives in some way, as it is no where near over yet. May you stay safe and healthy.

https://www.facebook.com/clearwatercultures/

March 7
HOW DO WE REALLY PROTECT OURSELVES FROM VIRUSES?
Viruses are mini-parasites, completely unable to live on their own without a host. They can’t replicate themselves, produce offspring, or survive for very long unless a host gives them access to our DNA. Once inside our cells they take over our DNA and use our own cellular processes to replicate themselves until they eventually consume the host cell. Viruses can genetically modify our DNA and rewrite the narrative of our body system, turning healthy cells into cancer, more viruses, or other abnormal disease states. Viruses can also get passed on to future generations through sperm and eggs.

Viruses are transferred from an infected person to another through the skin and mucosal lining of the body openings (mouth, eyes, nose, ears, etc.). The skin is our first line of defense against all pathogens. The skin and mucosal linings are covered in trillions of probiotic microbes in a healthy human. These microbes have 99 times more genetic abilities than humans and they outnumber human cells by 10 to 1. A healthy natural skin microbiome can identify pathogens and destroy them before they enter our body.

If we lack an outer probiotic microbiome of protection and viruses penetrate our skin and mucosal linings, then our immune system cells step in to try to protect us (bone marrow cells, T-cells, etc.). Identification of a virus cell can be difficult because they are extremely small and they hide themselves using parts of our own cells, like wrapping themselves with pieces our own cell membranes to avoid detection.

Our body must be able to tell the difference between our own cells and intruders. Our own immune system’s memory cells have a record of all the pathogens we previously developed immunity to. We don’t have memory cells for new pathogens, so we don’t have antibodies to protect us from new diseases we’ve never been exposed to. Thankfully the earth’s natural microbiome has a record of all pathogens that have affected all species on earth, during all time periods, on all continents, eco systems, etc. It’s vast genome and communication system can transfer immune information around the planet to improve the immune response of humans, animals and plants faster than pathogens can adapt and destroy.

Our microbiome is the most powerful part of our immune system. It is vital to our survival. Natural plants and minerals in and on our body feed our microbiome so that it stays resilient. Synthetic chemicals like anti-bacterial hand sanitizers, antibiotics and bleach destroy our natural microbiome, leaving us nakedly vulnerable to future infections. If we kill the microbiome on our skin, we destroy our first line of defense, leaving ourselves vulnerable to every new pathogenic adaptation.

There are no drugs or vaccines that can create future predictions of how a pathogen will adapt and mutate as it spreads through the population hacking into the DNA of many races. Drugs cannot transform themselves into new types of antibodies, nor can they adapt to changes in the environment in order to create new defenses against infection. Drugs are essentially stuck in the space and time they were made in. By the time new drugs get released, pathogens have mutated many times over.

Viruses mutate very rapidly to escape detection. The viruses we are dealing with in today’s world are highly adaptable because they have multiple types of viruses within them. To protect ourselves from super viruses and H.A.P.s (Heathcare, Adaptogenic Pathogens that are antibiotic and drug resistant), we must have a probiotic biome of cells in and on our body that can adapt faster than the pathogens. The natural probiotic microbiome of earth is the only thing humans have that has more biodiversity and adaptability than all pathogens. Biodiversity and adaptability are the fundamental keys to survival.

Earth’s probiotic microbiome constantly updates, transforms, and adapts in order to create new and novel strains of microbes that can destroy pathogens. The microbiome has the fastest communication and adaptation systems of all life forms on earth. It also has the oldest intact genetic code with a record of everything that has ever happened on earth in all species.

Unfortunately, Americans have used so many synthetic chemicals on and in our bodies and environments that we have some of the most damaged microbiomes on earth. Many Americans are10% microbiome and 90% synthetic chemicals which means we are 90% more likely to get diseases of all types. If we continue to kill our microbiome in our panic to protect ourselves from pandemics, we will weaken our greatest defense system, our probiotic microbiome.

What creates a healthy microbiome on our skin and mucosal membranes? NATURE does. Organic plants and minerals in the soil. Things that grow naturally in environments of nourishment, nurturing and love through natural growth and development, NOT artificial genetic modifications and forced synthetic chemical bonds in labs and factories.

Plants and animals have a microbiome too. If we use anti-bio (anti-life) products on plants and animals, in our homes, yards and gardens, we create artificial and sterile environments that are highly susceptible to pathogens because we’ve starved-out the probiotic microbes that normally protect us.
A healthy microbiome helps cleanse our body of waste products and toxins. It delivers biodiverse (a broad range of nutrients) and bioavailable (fermented and predigested) nutrition to each cell. These amazing single-cell microbes formulate nutrients that match our individual needs, giving each cell of our body the specific care and nutrition needed. We may eat food, but without a healthy microbiome, food particles don’t get broken down small enough to feed our inner cells. Undigested food can create toxic and septic conditions in our body that are breeding grounds for pathogens.

Probiotic pills contain approximately 1% or less of the microbial spectrum. Commercial probiotic pills can’t update, adapt, and form new responses to each change happening on earth the way living cultures can. Many of these commercial probiotics are synthetic clones made from replicating a tiny fragment of microbiome genetics.

If you want real microbiome protection from pathogens, parasites, poisons, predators, and propaganda, then nourish your body with nature’s medicines, grow your own probiotic cultures, get living cultures and probiotic products on your skin, and get out into nature.
I see your love shining out from my furry friends faces, when I look into their eyes. I see you in the flower’s smile, the rainbow, and the wind in the trees....

Post Reply

Return to “General discussions”