The Real Epidemic

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Spiritwind
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The Real Epidemic

Post by Spiritwind »

The real epidemic in my opinion, that the world at large seems to remain either blissfully unaware of, or too distracted by the monotonous repetition of mostly fake covid19 statistics and constant mandates:

https://worldpopulationreview.com/state ... s-by-state

What is human trafficking? Human trafficking is a serious crime and violation of human rights, involving the use of force, coercion or fraud to exploit a person into slave labor or sexual exploitation.

Human trafficking can happen to people of all ages and genders, and of any race or religious background. Victims frequently do not seek help due to language barriers, fear of their traffickers or fear of law enforcement. Because human trafficking is considered to be a hidden crime, several key indicators can help people recognize potential endangerment and notify law enforcement. A common misconception about human trafficking is that it does not happen in the United States. This is false, as the United States is ranked as one of the worst countries in the world for human trafficking. It is estimated that 199,000 incidents occur within the United States every year.

The National Human Trafficking Hotline has one of the most extensive data sets on human trafficking in the United States collected through phone calls, texts, online chats, emails, and online tips received by the hotline. While this information is some of the most comprehensive available, the data does not define the totality of human trafficking. The number of cases presented is only the cases that are reported.

The Human Trafficking Hotline serves victims and survivors of human trafficking across the United States. The Hotline is available 24/7, 365 days a year, and in more than 200 languages. The confidential Hotline helps any person of any age, religion, race, language, gender identity, sexual orientation, or disability. To contact the Hotline to report a tip, seek services, or ask for help, dial 1-888-373-7888. Hearing and speech-impaired individuals should dial 711. You can also send an SMS text to 233-733 or start a live chat on their website.

States with the Highest Human Trafficking Rates
Washington D.C. has the highest human trafficking rate in the United States of 11.66 victims per 100,000 people. In 2019, there were 34 human trafficking cases reported in D.C., 18 of which were sex trafficking, 7 of which were labor trafficking, 7 were unspecified and 3 were sex and labor trafficking.

Nevada has the second-highest human trafficking rate of 9.97 victims per 100,000 people. Nevada has 124 reported human trafficking cases in 2019, 100 of which were sex trafficking cases. Because adult prostitution is legal in 11 counties in Nevada, traffickers use legal brothels to traffic children by creating false identification. Delaware has the third-highest human trafficking rate of 4.27 victims per 100,000 people. Delaware has 14 cases reported in 2019, 10 of which were sex trafficking. Females were the majority of victims in the cases. Delaware is a popular state for traffickers due to its location on I-95.

With a human trafficking rate of 4.2 victims per 100,000 people, Nebraska has the fourth-highest human trafficking rate in the United States. Nebraska had 25 reported cases in 2019, the majority of which were sex trafficking cases. Females were the primary target of sex trafficking, mostly adults but some minors were involved as well. Some of the main centers of trafficking in Nebraska are Omaha, Lincoln, and Grand Island.

California has the fifth-highest rate of human trafficking of 4.15 victims per 100,000 residents. California has the highest number of human trafficking cases reported of 749 cases in 2019. Given California’s location by an international border and presence of major airports, traffickers see the state as a low-risk, high-reward, and profitable human trafficking location. Of the 749 cases reported, 535 were sex trafficking, 85 were labor trafficking, 81 were unspecified, and 48 were sex and labor trafficking.

Michigan has the sixth-highest human trafficking rate of 3.81 victims per 100,000 people. Michigan has the seventh-highest number of sex trafficking cases reported in 2019 of 172. Of the 172 cases, 131 of them were sex trafficking, 16 were unspecified, 15 were labor trafficking, and 10 were sex and labor. The top industries for labor trafficking in Michigan were restaurants and foodservice and traveling sales crew and the top industries for sex trafficking were residence-based commercial sex and hotel- and motel-based.

Georgia has the seventh-highest human trafficking rate of 3.49 victims per 100,000 residents. Georgia has the fifth-highest number of human trafficking cases of 222 in 2019. Atlanta, in particular, is a major human trafficking transportation hub and is one of the top U.S. cities with the highest levels of child sex trafficking. Of the 222 cases in 2019, 159 were sex trafficking, 41 were labor trafficking, 13 were sex and labor, and nine were unspecified. About 57 cases were confirmed to involved minors.

Hawaii has the eighth-highest human trafficking rate in the United States of 3.4 victims per 100,000 people. In 2019, Hawaii had 21 reported human trafficking cases. A study published interviewed sex trafficking victims in Hawaii. The study revealed that more than 75% of trafficked victims reported being homeless, 64% of victims were Native Hawaiian, and 82% of victims were first trafficked as children.

New Mexico has the ninth-highest human trafficking rate in the U.S. of 3.34 cases per 100,000 people. There were 31 reported human trafficking cases in 2019 in New Mexico. The majority of human trafficking cases are sex trafficking, with most of the victims being female. New Mexico is a prime location for human trafficking because the interstate exchange of I-25 and I-40 called the Big I. New Mexico is also attractive to traffickers because of its high rates of poverty and domestic violence.

With a human trafficking rate of 3.26 victims per 100,000 people, Kansas has the tenth-highest rate in the country. There were 43 reported cases in 2019. The majority of cases were sex trafficking and the majority of victims were female. Cities and counties along the I-70 corridor in Kansas experience a high-than-average amount of trafficking.


Here’s another one of many samples from a simple internet search.
https://www.mercurynews.com/2020/02/26/ ... -bay-area/


And I stay out of the political fray as much as possible, but will say that since Trump has been in office it seems there is more attention being given to this real epidemic.
https://www.dailywire.com/news/sex-traf ... oseph-curl

What I have posted barely scratches the surface, but felt it important to bring more attention to what I feel is truly a worldwide epidemic of such proportions that it boggles the mind, and is going on at the highest levels of society, as well as the lowest. Thing is, when you have a ridiculous amount of wealth, you can much more easily buy your way into anonymity. Except for the fact that it makes for an excellent black mail tool. Let’s see what happens as time goes on with the recent arrest of Ghislaine Maxwell.

Oh, and by the way, Epstein didn’t kill himself.....


Afterthought - here is a link on missing children, to add to the bigger picture. This is where we should be putting our focus. I mean, even animals protect their offspring, and this is the story no one seems to want to talk about.
https://www.missingkids.org/footer/media/KeyFacts
I see your love shining out from my furry friends faces, when I look into their eyes. I see you in the flower’s smile, the rainbow, and the wind in the trees....

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Spiritwind
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Re: The Real Epidemic

Post by Spiritwind »

I tried to post this yesterday, and it even showed that it did, then when I went back, it wasn’t there. So, trying again today. I know the idea that we have a full blown epidemic of pedophiles running amok throughout the land seems preposterous. But it is unfortunately all too real. And to equate love with sex, when in reality they are just trying to make us buy the idea that anything goes is just “.......” (insert whatever swear words you want there). I know it’s not uplifting information, but it isn’t going to go away by ignoring it either. And, personally, being a mother, I naturally feel inclined to protect children from this kind of deranged behavior and thinking. First, you have to truly see the enormity of the problem, and how pervasive it has actually become.

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I see your love shining out from my furry friends faces, when I look into their eyes. I see you in the flower’s smile, the rainbow, and the wind in the trees....

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